My Work

Here’s a quick list of the various rpg products I’ve worked on. Those marked with an asterisk are sole writing credit and those that aren’t marked are a shared credit. Other work (editor, developer, etc.) is as noted. I’ll add some more detail to these at a later date (and maybe some more creds that I’ve missed) but for now here’s what I’ve done:

FASA Corporation

Battletech

  • Battletech: Technical Readout 3025
  • Sorenson’s Sabers*
  • Wolf’s Dragoons Sourcebook*
  • More Tales of the Black Widow
  • Battle for Twycross*
  • Solaris VII: The Game World
  • Battletech: Mercenary’s Handbook

Shadowrun

  • Neo-Anarchist’s Guide to North America

Bard Games

  • Cyclopedia Talislanta (multi-volume work, author)
  • The Compleat Alchemist

TSR

Greyhawk Setting

  • Rary the Traitor*
  • Patriots of Ulek*

Forgotten Realms Setting

  • The Marco Volo trilogy*
  • The Elves of Evermeet*
  • Spellbound*
  • Elminster’s Ecologies

Dark Sun Setting

  • The Asticlian Gambit*
  • Dune Trader*

Birthright Setting

  • The Rjurik Highlands*

Lankhmar Setting

  • Lankhmar: City of Adventure, 2nd ed.*
  • Tales of Lankhmar

Other

  • Creative Campaigning

Wizards of the Coast

  • The Complete Alchemist (product editing/development)
  • Drow of the Underdark
  • Elder Evils

White Wolf, aka Sword and Sorcery Studios

Scarred Lands Setting

  • Mithril: City of the Golem (author, developer)
  • Hollowfaust: City of Necromancers (developer)
  • The Divine and the Defeated (author, developer)
  • The Wise and the Wicked (developer)
  • Creature Collection II: Dark Menagerie (author, developer)
  • Burok Torn: City Under Siege (developer)
  • Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen (developer)
  • Secrets and Societies (developer)
  • Relics and Rituals
  • Relics and Rituals II: Lost Lore (developer)
  • Scarred Lands Campaign Setting: Ghelspad (author, developer)
  • Hornsaw: Forest of Blood (developer)
  • Shelzar: City of Sin (developer)
  • The Penumbral Pentagon (developer)
  • Blood Bayou (developer)
  • Creature Collection III (author, developer)
  • Scarred Lands Campaign Setting: Termana (author, developer)
  • Scarred Lands Gazetteer: Termana (author, developer)
  • In Sunlight and Shadow (short story in the anthology “Champions of the Scarred Lands.”)

Ravenloft Setting

  • Ravenloft: Heroes of Light (editor)
  • Ravenloft Gazetteer IV
  • Ravenloft Dungeon Master’s Guide
  • Legacy of Blood

Everquest RPG

  • Luclin*
  • Monsters of Luclin
  • Forests of Faydark
  • Dagnor’s Cauldron
  • Islands of Mist
  • Everquest II Players Guide
  • Al’Kabor’s Arcana

Fantasy Flight Games

  • Highwall: City of Shadow*

Necromancer Games

  • Wilderlands of High Fantasy (editor)
  • Demonheart
  • Coils of Set (editor)
  • The Doom of Listonshire (editor)

Troll Lords Games

  • The Six Spheres (co-editor)
  • A Family Affair (editor)
  • Shades of Grey (editor)

 Green Ronin Games

  • Buccaneers of Freeport
  • A Song of Ice and Fire Campaign Guide

Paizo Publications

  • Mystery Monsters Revisited
  • Mythical Monsters Revisited
  • Dungeons of Golarion

 


Here are some of the more exciting or well-known products I’ve worked on, with some comments:

Wolf’s Dragoons was probably my favorite of the Battletech products I worked on. This one was an unshared credit, and added lots of canonical details about the toughest and most mysterious mercenaries in the Inner Sphere. Unfortunately I didn’t answer the ultimate question of where they came from, because I didn’t know and neither did FASA. The Clans came later, and the Dragoons were retconned into their timeline.

Bard Games’ Talislanta was a real heartbreaker — an exciting and innovative world that proved a little too esoteric for most people. I and a stable of talented folks worked on a series of supplements that detailed each section of the continent, its lands, peoples and customs.

Boy did I have fun writing the Marco Volo trilogy. I had a relatively free hand and incorporated humor, satire, references to such diverse sources as “Time Bandits” and “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” as well as working in what I believe to be the first black paladin, a band of very polite gnolls, swashbuckling goblins, a treasure trove of cheeses and a special tribute to my friend Dale’s band of performing gnomes.

The Elves of Evermeet was one of my other favorites, despite being pilloried here as including one of the 24 most embarrassing D&D classes. I’ll have you know that it was me — Anthony Pryor — and NOT Lisa Frank who designed the Unicorn Rider, I am still proud of this book, so you can sit and spin, mister io9 pseudo-hipster columnist…

White Wolf tried to break the mold with the Scarred Lands, adding a dark, adult-oriented setting to a hobby that had up until then been almost painfully bright and wholesome. The Divine and the Defeated was a list of the gods of the Scarred Lands, one per alignment, with their own grim and often tragic and violent backstories, personalities and legends. White Wolf showed the world how it was done, and I’m especially honored to have been part of it.

Hornsaw, Forest of Blood was one of our Ennie nominees and although it didn’t win, it brought considerable attention to both White Wolf’s Sword and Sorcery Studios and its authors, my good friends Joseph Carriker and the lovely Rhiannon Louve.

The Everquest rpg was based on the d20 system and was one of the first attempts to bring an MMO to the gaming table. Though initially popular it didn’t survive, proving that computer games are computer games and tabletop rpgs are tabletop rpgs, a lesson that the creators of D&D 4th Edition would have done well to remember.

Demonheart was one of several projects I undertook for Necromancer Games, and it did not see the light of day until after D20 had been swept under the rug by D&D 4E. I’m told it sold fairly well on and drivethrurpg.com.

I haven’t been as active in the rpg industry lately owing to work and a focus on my fiction, but I’ve managed to fit in one or two projects, including this fun book for Paizo in which I did writeups of the Australian bunyip and the African Mokole-mbembe.

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